Special Interest Programs



Monday Morning, June 18

 

9:30–10:45 a.m.


SIP 1

Advancements for High-Density PM Components

Program Organizers:

Chris Hammer,
Keystone Powdered Metal Company

Robert Hayes,
Phoenix Sintered Metals LLC

Amber Neilan, PMT,
North American Höganäs Co.






As the demand for high-performance powder metallurgy (PM) applications grow, advancements in high-density component manufacturing is key for continued growth of the PM industry. Progression towards higher densities to enhance mechanical performance plays a vital role in the ability for PM manufacturing to compete against wrought and cast iron components. The recent developments in compaction and sintering technologies have opened up new possibilities to achieve higher densities. This program will focus on the advancement towards high-density component manufacturing using developments made in press-and-die set design, die wall lubrication systems, and sintering technologies.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
Robert Hayes,
Phoenix Sintered Metals LLC

202 USA

Recent Press-and-Die Set Design Developments Facilitating High-Density Part Forming

Gregory D. Wallis,
Dorst America, Inc.

186 Canada

High-Density Potential and Limitations with Die Wall Lubrication Technique and Lubricants

Patrick Lemieux,
Imfine Corp.

182 USA

A Comparison of Conventional Sintering, Conventional Sinter Hardening and High-Temperature Sinter Hardening on High-Density Sinter-Hardenable Material Systems

Stephen L. Feldbauer,
Abbott Furnace Company


Monday Afternoon, June 18

 

2:30–3:45 p.m.


SIP 2—PART 1

Energy Generation & Storage Technologies—I

Program Organizers:

John Johnson,
Elmet Technologies LLC

Michael L. Marucci,
GKN Powder Metallurgy

Virendra Warke,
Entegris, Inc.







In the past decade, energy generation and storage have significantly advanced and developed. For example, wind and solar energy generation has gone through major transformation both on technology levels and cost of manufacturing and installations. But the great stumbling block for solar energy, as well as wind power and electric vehicles, has always been storage. Battery technology has gained traction in the last few years for providing more efficient energy storage solutions for renewable energy, portable electronics, electric vehicles, and healthcare. These developments present opportunities and threats to the powder metallurgy industry. The intent of this special interest program is to review new PM solutions for power generation and storage as well as the current state of the art in battery technology. The impact of new battery technology on the growth of electric vehicles and the consequences on PM powertrain components will be explored.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
John Johnson,
Elmet Technologies LLC

175 USA

Nanogalvanic Aluminum Alloys for Hydrogen Generation

Anit Giri,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

176 Germany

Demonstrating a Metal Hydride-Based Energy Storage System for a Residential Home

Bettina Neumann,
GKN Sinter Metals Engineering GmbH

283 USA

Production of Oxygen on Mars: Flight Qualification of a Solid Oxide Carbide Dioxide Electrolysis Stack

Salvator Nigarura,
Global Tungsten and Powders Corp.

Monday Afternoon, June 18

 

4:00–5:15 p.m.


SIP 2—PART 2

Energy Generation & Storage Technologies—II

Program Organizers:

John Johnson,
Elmet Technologies LLC

Michael L. Marucci,
GKN Powder Metallurgy

Virendra Warke,
Entegris, Inc.









In the past decade, energy generation and storage have significantly advanced and developed. For example, wind and solar energy generation have gone through major transformation both on technology levels and cost of manufacturing and installations. But the great stumbling block for solar energy, as well as wind power and electric vehicles, has always been storage. Battery technology has gained traction in the last few years for providing more efficient energy storage solutions for renewable energy, portable electronics, electric vehicles, and healthcare. These developments present opportunities and threats to the powder metallurgy industry. The intent of this special interest program is to review new PM solutions for power generation and storage as well as the current state of the art in battery technology. The impact of new battery technology on the growth of electric vehicles and the consequences on PM powertrain components will be explored.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
Virendra S. Warke,
Entegris, Inc.

005 USA

Extending the Range of EVs Cost Effectively: A PM Industry Challenge and Opportunity

Gregory E. Peterson,
Lightweight Innovations For Tomorrow (LIFT)

177 USA

The Importance of Powders and Powder Processing on Battery Performance

Quinn Horn,
Exponent, Inc.

174 USA

Molybdenum in Photovoltaic Technology

John Shields, Jr., FAPMI,
PentaMet Associates, LLC

Tuesday Morning, June 19

 

8:00–9:15 a.m.


SIP 3—PART 1

Tungsten & Refractory Metals: Cobalt-Free Refractory Metals—I

Program Organizers:

Robert J. Dowding,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

Michael T. Stawovy,
H. C. Starck, Inc..









This program will examine topics of current interest to the refractory metals and manufacturing community and others with interest in these processes and related materials. In these sessions we will present the latest information on the health, safety, and regulatory environment surrounding the use of tungsten carbides and, in particular, cobalt. Presentations will be provided that examine the replacement of cobalt in the WC cermet system and provide cobalt-free options for this material. Further we will examine the emerging technology of additive manufacturing with particular emphasis on refractory metals in this manufacturing environment.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
Thomas Jewett,
Global Tungsten & Powders Corporation

230 Sweden

Cobalt-Related Regulatory Actions and Possible Impact on the Hardmetal Industry

Tuulia Svanehav,
Sandvik Machining Solutions

229 USA

Impact of Hardmetal Recycling Options for a Significant Reduction in the Use of Cobalt as a Binder

James J. Oakes,
Consultant

236 France

Further Developments on Co-Free WHA for Defence and Aerospace Application

Rafael F. Cury,
Plansee Tungsten Alloys

Tuesday Morning, June 19

 

10:30–11:45 a.m.


SIP 3—PART 2

Tungsten & Refractory Metals: Cobalt-Free Refractory Metals—II

Program Organizers:

Robert J. Dowding,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

Michael T. Stawovy,
H. C. Starck, Inc.









This program will examine topics of current interest to the refractory metals and manufacturing community and others with interest in these processes and related materials. In these sessions we will present the latest information on the health, safety, and regulatory environment surrounding the use of tungsten carbides and, in particular, cobalt. Presentations will be provided that examine the replacement of cobalt in the WC cermet system and provide cobalt-free options for this material. Further we will examine the emerging technology of additive manufacturing with particular emphasis on refractory metals in this manufacturing environment.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
Michael T. Stawovy,
H. C. Starck, Inc.

231 USA

Cobalt-Free, Alternative Binder Systems for Tungsten Carbide Cermets

John J. Pittari, III,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

232 USA

A New Methodology for Design of Cermets: ‘Green’ Replacement for Cobalt Binder in WC

Heather A. Murdoch,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

233 USA

Role of Alloy Design in the Sintering and Component Performance of Nanogranular Refractory Metal Parts

Troy Holland,
Veloxint Corporation

Tuesday Morning, June 19

 

2:15–3:30 p.m.


SIP 3—PART 3

Tungsten & Refractory Metals: Additive Manufacturing of Refractory Metals

Program Organizers:

Robert J. Dowding,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

Michael T. Stawovy,
H. C. Starck, Inc.









This program will examine topics of current interest to the refractory metals and manufacturing community and others with interest in these processes and related materials. In these sessions we will present the latest information on the health, safety, and regulatory environment surrounding the use of tungsten carbides and, in particular, cobalt. Presentations will be provided that examine the replacement of cobalt in the WC cermet system and provide cobalt-free options for this material. Further we will examine the emerging technology of additive manufacturing with particular emphasis on refractory metals in this manufacturing environment.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
Robert J. Dowding,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

287 USA

Additive Manufacturing of Cemented Carbides

Ravi K. Enneti,
Global Tungsten & Powders Corporation

278 USA

Additive Manufacturing of Fully Dense Tungsten Heavy Alloy

Michael T. Stawovy,
H. C. Starck, Inc.

235 USA

Study of the Effect of Particle Size on the Additive Manufacturing of Tungsten Using Powder Bed Fusion

Andelle D. Kudzal,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

Tuesday Afternoon, June 19

 

4:15–5:30 p.m.


SIP 3—PART 4

Tungsten & Refractory Metals: Refractory Metals

Program Organizers:

Robert J. Dowding,
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

Michael T. Stawovy,
H. C. Starck, Inc.









This program will examine topics of current interest to the refractory metals and manufacturing community and others with interest in these processes and related materials. In these sessions we will present the latest information on the health, safety, and regulatory environment surrounding the use of tungsten carbides and, in particular, cobalt. Presentations will be provided that examine the replacement of cobalt in the WC cermet system and provide cobalt-free options for this material. Further we will examine the emerging technology of additive manufacturing with particular emphasis on refractory metals in this manufacturing environment.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
John Johnson,
Elmet Technologies LLC

240 USA

Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) of Ductile, Oxidation-Resistant Molybdenum-Based Alloys

Nicholas Hatcher,
QuesTek Innovations, LLC

224 USA

Sintering, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Tungsten

Zhigang Z. Fang, FAPMI,
University of Utah

184 USA

PM Hard Materials in Energy Generation Applications

Hongtao Wang,
Kennametal Inc.


Wednesday Morning, June 20

 

8:00–9:15 a.m.


SIP 4—PART 1

Machinability: New Considerations for PM Machining

Program Organizers:

Carl Blais,
Laval University

Denis Christopherson, PMT,
Federal-Mogul Sintered Products









Machining of powder metallurgy materials is a critical practice for most PM applications, often defining fit, form, function, and financial success. The process of machining PM materials is arguably more complex than cast and wrought materials, and tools and techniques used for the latter are not optimized for the former. This Special Interest Program will offer perspective toward typical PM machining challenges and methods to measure, analyze, and improve the machining process. Within the program, focused presentations include PM material advances, tool technology, machining process characterization and case studies, providing a wide scope of ideas and concepts useful to anyone involved in PM machining.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
Carl Blais,
Laval University

183 USA

Introduction of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) for PM Reaming

Denis Christopherson, PMT,
Federal-Mogul Sintered Products

124 USA

Machining Solutions for PM Materials—Linking Principles to PM Applications

Bo Hu,
North American Höganäs Co.

191 USA

Humidity and Temperature: A Study on the Stability of MnS and Effect on Machining

Bruce Lindsley,
Hoeganaes Corporation


Wednesday Morning, June 20

 

9:30–10:45 a.m.


SIP 4—PART 2

Machinability: Machining Alternatives for PM Materials

Program Organizers:

Carl Blais,
Laval University

Denis Christopherson, PMT,
Federal-Mogul Sintered Products









Machining of powder metal materials is a critical practice for most PM applications, often defining fit, form, function and financial success. The process of machining PM materials is arguably more complex than cast and wrought materials, and tools and techniques used for the latter are not optimized for the former. This Special Interest Program will offer perspective toward typical PM machining challenges and methods to measure, analyse, and improve the machining process. Within the program, focused presentations include PM material advances, tool technology, machining process characterization and case studies, providing a wide scope of ideas and concepts useful to anyone involved in PM machining.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
Denis Christopherson, PMT,
Federal-Mogul Sintered Products

189 USA

Modern Tools and Techniques for Machining PM Materials

Don E. Graham,
Seco Tools

221 USA

A Systematic Approach to Successfully Machining Powdered Metals Based on Both Theoretical and Empirical Data

Gary T. McCarel,
Star Cutter Company

210 USA

Super Abrasive Grinding— A Cost Effective Means to Finish Hardened Parts

Matthew Brown,
Advanced Automotive Grinding


Wednesday Morning, June 20

 

11:00 a.m.–12:15 p.m.


SIP 4—PART 3

Machinability: Modeling and Practice of PM Machining

Program Organizers:

Carl Blais,
Laval University

Denis Christopherson, PMT,
Federal-Mogul Sintered Products









Machining of powder metal materials is a critical practice for most PM applications, often defining fit, form, function and financial success. The process of machining PM materials is arguably more complex than cast and wrought materials, and tools and techniques used for the latter are not optimized for the former. This Special Interest Program will offer perspective toward typical PM machining challenges and methods to measure, analyse, and improve the machining process. Within the program, focused presentations include PM material advances, tool technology, machining process characterization and case studies, providing a wide scope of ideas and concepts useful to anyone involved in PM machining.

Individual presentation times will run 25 minutes, including questions. Manuscripts that are submitted will be published in the conference proceedings.

Session Chairman:
Gilles L'Esperance,
Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal

195 Germany

Innovative Use of Statistics and Design of Experiments for PM Machining Optimization

Thorsten Upmeier,
Federal-Mogul Burscheid GmbH

217 USA

Tools and Methods for Understanding Machinability in PM

John Engquist, FAPMI,
JENS Solutions Inc.

241 Japan

Powder Metal Machining Using CBN Materials

Hironari Moroguchi,
Sumitomo Electric Hardmetal Corporation


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Additive Manufacturing with Powder Metallurgy

Learn more about the co-located Additive Manufacturing with Powder Metallurgy (AMPM2018) conference. Registration for either POWDERMET2018 or AMPM2018 provides full access to BOTH conferences.